Large Canadian Churches Draw an Estimated 300,000 Worshippers Each Week: Findings from a National Study

By Warren Bird in collaboration with a Canadian research team — Description: For Canadians who attended a Protestant church last weekend, an estimated one in eight attended a church that draws 1,000 or more in weekly attendance. These predominantly evangelical congregations are growing, reaching out, and focused on serving children and youth. Terms like megachurch, church growth, multiple services, and congregations with lots of young families bring to mind countries like the United States (think Joel Osteen and Lakewood, or Rick Warren and Saddleback), Nigeria (with sanctuaries that seat over 50,000), Korea (home to the world’s largest-attendance church) and other parts of the world – but Canada too? Isn’t church attendance on the decline across the 10 provinces and 3 territories? This article discusses the findings of a research project that found that Canadian “megachurches” are increasingly popular amongst Canadians, with 1 in 8 Protestants attending these congregations weekly. This report discusses how large churches appear to be an attractive and likely enduring option for Canadians seeking an experience of engaged and growing congregational life. Leaders of these churches report that they are evangelistically effective, are reaching a diverse ethnic population, and are expanding to multisite venues—all with high-quality ministry

Read More...

Faith & Settlement Research Project

Faith & Settlement Partnerships: Resource Packet — Description: This Packet has been compiled as part of the Faith and Settlement Partnerships: Setting Immigrants and Canada up for Success project which is a research partnership that explores partnerships between faith-based and government-funded settlement organizations. This two-year project was led by the Centre for Community Based Research (CCBR) and funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC). Click here for more information. — Keywords: research, ccbr, sshrc, settlement, immigrants, Canada — External Links: Faith & Settlement Partnerships — Workshops Guide Faith & Settlement Partnerships — TIM Centre   —

Read More...

Beginning the Discussion

By Ruth Cassidy and James Grunaua — Abstract: God calls the church to deep levels of engagement with refugees and new immigrants that ultimately reveals God’s heart of compassion for vulnerable people, his desire for believers to live in right relationship with the “other,” his design for creation that includes unity with diversity, and his self-giving love that invites broken humanity into its embrace. — Keywords: new Canadian, refugee, sojourner, diaspora, displaced, church development, education, training —

Read More...

Unequal Relations

By Augie Fleras: A Critical Introduction to Race, Ethnic, and Aboriginal Dynamics in Canada — Description: Unequal Relations: A Critical Introduction to Race, Ethnic, and Aboriginal Dynamics in Canada is the market-leading, single-voice text for Race and Ethnicity courses in Canada, and it includes comprehensive coverage of racism, multiculturalism and diversity. This mature edition has been updated to remain current, and to include new sub-topics important to the discipline, including explicit discussion of the importance of immigration to Canada and its role in national building; older waves of immigration; and shifting attitudes of normalized immigrant groups. — Keywords: immigrants, immigration, refugees, multiculturalism, Canada, newcomers, settlement, research, racism — External Links: https://www.amazon.ca/Unequal-Relations-Introduction-Aboriginal-Dynamics/dp/0132310600

Read More...

Community Connection / Connexion Communautaire

— Description: A directory of over 20,000 community, social, health and government services Toronto’s #1 online resource for human service professionals. — Keywords: immigrant services, 211, new Canadians, immigrant, refugees — External Links: https://www.211toronto.ca

Read More...

CultureLink

— Description: A settlement agency for new Canadians, CultureLink is a not-for-profit community-based organization that facilitates the settlement of newcomers to Toronto, Canada. — Keywords: immigrant services, settlement — External Links: Home

Read More...

Statistics Canada Socio-Economic Profiles

— Description: Produced by Statistics Canada, in partnership with the Department of Canadian Heritage, this is a series of 15 socio-economic profiles of Canada’s largest, fastest-growing ethno-cultural communities. The series uses 2001 Census data and includes the Chinese, Vietnamese, African, Arab, Caribbean, East Indian, Filipino, Haitian, Jamaican, Japanese, Korean, Latin American, Lebanese, South Asian, and West Asian communities. To date, profiles of 10 communities have been released; the remaining 5 will be released by the end of August. — Keywords: statistics, ethnic profiles, country profiles, languages, demographics, new Canadians, immigrant, refugee, migrant, migrant worker, temporary worker, international student — External Links: http://www12.statcan.ca/English/census01/products/analytic/companion/etoimm/canada.cfm

Read More...

Anglican Resources for Multicultural Sunday

— Description: Designating and celebrating the Feast of Pentecost as a Multicultural Sunday allows the Anglican Diocese of Toronto to embody a vision to recognize the value of diversity in building communities of hope and compassion as expressed in Ephesians 2:19: So then you are no longer strangers and sojourners, but you are fellow citizens with the saints and members of the household of God. It is our hope that these parish resources will help reflect and act on what it means to be a multicultural church. — Keywords: church planting, Christian ministry, newcomers, missions, immigrant services, multicultural, social justice, new Canadians, immigrant, foreigner, alien, migrant, intercultural, diversity, cross-cultural, missional, commission, church development, worship, church, evangelism — External Links: http://www.toronto.anglican.ca/parish-life/diversity-resources

Read More...

Canada’s Ethnocultural Mosaic, 2006 Census

Published by authority of the Minister responsible for Statistics Canada © Minister of Industry, 2008 — Description: This report examines the ethnic origins of Canada’s population using data from the 2006 Census. It also provides information on the nation’s visible minority population. Each wave of immigration to Canada has increased the ethnocultural diversity of the nation’s population. In fact, the 2006 Census enumerated more than 200 different ethnic origins. Ethnic origin refers to the ethnic or cultural origins of the respondent’s ancestors. An ancestor is someone from whom a person is descended and is usually more distant than a grandparent. In contrast, the 1901 Census recorded about 25 different ethnic groups in Canada. People who reported Aboriginal ancestries, and British and French origins, comprised the lion’s share of the population at that time. The list of ethnic origins in 2006 includes cultural groups associated with Canada’s Aboriginal people (North American Indian, Métis and Inuit) and the European groups that first settled in Canada, such as the English, French Scottish and Irish. It includes origins of immigrants who came to Canada over the past century, such as German, Italian, Chinese, Ukrainian, Dutch, Polish, East Indian and so on. Among newer groups

Read More...

Diversity and Concentration in Canadian Immigration

Trends in Toronto, Montréal and Vancouver, 1971–2006 — Description: Centre for Urban and Community Studies, Research Bulletin 42 (© University of Toronto 2008) ISBN-13 978-0-7727-1466-4   — Keywords: research, demographics, statistics — External Links: http://www.urbancentre.utoronto.ca/pdfs/researchbulletins/CUCSRB42-Murdie-Cdn-Immigration3-2008.pdf

Read More...