Faith & Settlement Research Project

Faith & Settlement Partnerships: Resource Packet — Description: This Packet has been compiled as part of the Faith and Settlement Partnerships: Setting Immigrants and Canada up for Success project which is a research partnership that explores partnerships between faith-based and government-funded settlement organizations. This two-year project was led by the Centre for Community Based Research (CCBR) and funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC). Click here for more information. — Keywords: research, ccbr, sshrc, settlement, immigrants, Canada — External Links: Faith & Settlement Partnerships — Workshops Guide Faith & Settlement Partnerships — TIM Centre   —

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Unequal Relations

By Augie Fleras: A Critical Introduction to Race, Ethnic, and Aboriginal Dynamics in Canada — Description: Unequal Relations: A Critical Introduction to Race, Ethnic, and Aboriginal Dynamics in Canada is the market-leading, single-voice text for Race and Ethnicity courses in Canada, and it includes comprehensive coverage of racism, multiculturalism and diversity. This mature edition has been updated to remain current, and to include new sub-topics important to the discipline, including explicit discussion of the importance of immigration to Canada and its role in national building; older waves of immigration; and shifting attitudes of normalized immigrant groups. — Keywords: immigrants, immigration, refugees, multiculturalism, Canada, newcomers, settlement, research, racism — External Links: https://www.amazon.ca/Unequal-Relations-Introduction-Aboriginal-Dynamics/dp/0132310600

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Canada’s Ethnocultural Mosaic, 2006 Census

Published by authority of the Minister responsible for Statistics Canada © Minister of Industry, 2008 — Description: This report examines the ethnic origins of Canada’s population using data from the 2006 Census. It also provides information on the nation’s visible minority population. Each wave of immigration to Canada has increased the ethnocultural diversity of the nation’s population. In fact, the 2006 Census enumerated more than 200 different ethnic origins. Ethnic origin refers to the ethnic or cultural origins of the respondent’s ancestors. An ancestor is someone from whom a person is descended and is usually more distant than a grandparent. In contrast, the 1901 Census recorded about 25 different ethnic groups in Canada. People who reported Aboriginal ancestries, and British and French origins, comprised the lion’s share of the population at that time. The list of ethnic origins in 2006 includes cultural groups associated with Canada’s Aboriginal people (North American Indian, Métis and Inuit) and the European groups that first settled in Canada, such as the English, French Scottish and Irish. It includes origins of immigrants who came to Canada over the past century, such as German, Italian, Chinese, Ukrainian, Dutch, Polish, East Indian and so on. Among newer groups

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Diversity and Concentration in Canadian Immigration

Trends in Toronto, Montréal and Vancouver, 1971–2006 — Description: Centre for Urban and Community Studies, Research Bulletin 42 (© University of Toronto 2008) ISBN-13 978-0-7727-1466-4   — Keywords: research, demographics, statistics — External Links: http://www.urbancentre.utoronto.ca/pdfs/researchbulletins/CUCSRB42-Murdie-Cdn-Immigration3-2008.pdf

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Joshua Project

— Description: The mission and passion of Joshua Project is to identify and highlight the people groups of the world that have the least exposure to the Gospel and the least Christian presence in their midst. Joshua Project shares this information to encourage pioneer church-planting movements among every ethnic people group. — Keywords: people groups, culture, Church Planting, church development, languages, research — Links: https://joshuaproject.net

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The Role of Churches in Immigrant Settlement and Integration

The Role of Churches in Immigrant Settlement and Integration is a national research project conducted across Canada by the Centre for Community Based Research (CCBR) in five cities (Toronto, Montreal, Vancouver, Moncton and Halifax) and funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC).

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