Faith & Settlement Research Project

Faith & Settlement Partnerships: Resource Packet — Description: This Packet has been compiled as part of the Faith and Settlement Partnerships: Setting Immigrants and Canada up for Success project which is a research partnership that explores partnerships between faith-based and government-funded settlement organizations. This two-year project was led by the Centre for Community Based Research (CCBR) and funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC). Click here for more information. — Keywords: research, ccbr, sshrc, settlement, immigrants, Canada — External Links: Faith & Settlement Partnerships — Workshops Guide Faith & Settlement Partnerships — TIM Centre   —

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Unequal Relations

By Augie Fleras: A Critical Introduction to Race, Ethnic, and Aboriginal Dynamics in Canada — Description: Unequal Relations: A Critical Introduction to Race, Ethnic, and Aboriginal Dynamics in Canada is the market-leading, single-voice text for Race and Ethnicity courses in Canada, and it includes comprehensive coverage of racism, multiculturalism and diversity. This mature edition has been updated to remain current, and to include new sub-topics important to the discipline, including explicit discussion of the importance of immigration to Canada and its role in national building; older waves of immigration; and shifting attitudes of normalized immigrant groups. — Keywords: immigrants, immigration, refugees, multiculturalism, Canada, newcomers, settlement, research, racism — External Links: https://www.amazon.ca/Unequal-Relations-Introduction-Aboriginal-Dynamics/dp/0132310600

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Toronto as a Gateway City

The emerging study of gateway cities in sociology, history, and geography (Price and Benton-Short 2008, 6) reflects the significance of contemporary international migration. “While movements of people across borders have shaped states and societies since time immemorial, what is distinctive in recent years is their global scope, their centrality to domestic and international politics and their enormous economic and social consequences” (Castles and Miller 2003, 2). Based on a review of the research literature, Lisa Benton-Short and Marie Price suggest the following themes are significant for gateway cities: Hyperdiversity: This is characterized by “cities where no one country of origin accounts for 25 percent or more of the immigrant stock and immigrants come from all over the world” (Price and Benton-Short 2008, 15).  Episodic: Immigrant flows can change over time as they are influenced by factors of social networks and economics (Price and Benton-Short 2008, 16). -Immigration policies: “Shifting national policies are extremely important in explaining the changing flows and composition of immigrants to cities around the world” (Price and Benton- Short 2008, 17). Urban policies: Which may encourage or discourage immigrants. Identity: “Most people have nested identities based on different scales of belonging” (Price and Benton-Short 2008, 19). Spatial assimilation or segregation: Immigrant

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Globe and Mail Multiculturalism Series

— Description: The Globe and Mail published a series of articles in the first week of October, 2010 discussing the benefits and the pitfalls of Canada’s multicultural experiment. You can access the various articles by clicking on the links below. What we fear about Multiculturalism (Published Friday, Oct. 01, 2010) Diversity: Yes, in my backyard (Published Friday, Oct. 01, 2010) When Multiculturalism Doesn’t Work — by Ingrid Peritz and Joe Friesen (Published Friday, Oct. 01, 2010) Multiculturalism: Good, Bad and Ugly (Published Friday, Oct. 01, 2010) A few frank words about immigration — by Margaret Wente (Published Thursday, Oct. 07, 2010) 10 leaders on how to change multiculturalism (Published Friday, Oct. 08, 2010) — Keywords: multiculturalism, diversity, immigrants, culture — http://religionanddiversity.ca

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Creating a World of Welcome: On Mission at Home

 By Mark Chapman Syrian refugees are in the news but Canadian churches have been developing relationships with immigrants since immigrants first arrived on the shores of what is now Canada. The recent needs of Syrian refugees and the ongoing diversification of Canadian society have brought immigrants concerns to the attention of churches across Canada.   “What was once true only in Toronto and Vancouver is now true in places like Prince Albert, Saskatchewan and small communities in New Brunswick and places like that… These are communities that have been stable and white and are now being infused with color and accent. The huge cities weren’t ready for it 15 years ago, and the churches in the small towns are not ready for it now. We need to help them take on the challenge that’s before them.” A recent project on the Role of Churches in Immigrant Settlement and Integration aimed to help meet this need. The good news is that most churches already have the resources they need to make a difference. Canadian churches are happy to have immigrants come to their churches but they sometimes know little about how to help immigrants establish themselves in Canada or in the

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