Large Canadian Churches Draw an Estimated 300,000 Worshippers Each Week: Findings from a National Study

By Warren Bird in collaboration with a Canadian research team — Description: For Canadians who attended a Protestant church last weekend, an estimated one in eight attended a church that draws 1,000 or more in weekly attendance. These predominantly evangelical congregations are growing, reaching out, and focused on serving children and youth. Terms like megachurch, church growth, multiple services, and congregations with lots of young families bring to mind countries like the United States (think Joel Osteen and Lakewood, or Rick Warren and Saddleback), Nigeria (with sanctuaries that seat over 50,000), Korea (home to the world’s largest-attendance church) and other parts of the world – but Canada too? Isn’t church attendance on the decline across the 10 provinces and 3 territories? This article discusses the findings of a research project that found that Canadian “megachurches” are increasingly popular amongst Canadians, with 1 in 8 Protestants attending these congregations weekly. This report discusses how large churches appear to be an attractive and likely enduring option for Canadians seeking an experience of engaged and growing congregational life. Leaders of these churches report that they are evangelistically effective, are reaching a diverse ethnic population, and are expanding to multisite venues—all with high-quality ministry

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Unequal Relations

By Augie Fleras: A Critical Introduction to Race, Ethnic, and Aboriginal Dynamics in Canada — Description: Unequal Relations: A Critical Introduction to Race, Ethnic, and Aboriginal Dynamics in Canada is the market-leading, single-voice text for Race and Ethnicity courses in Canada, and it includes comprehensive coverage of racism, multiculturalism and diversity. This mature edition has been updated to remain current, and to include new sub-topics important to the discipline, including explicit discussion of the importance of immigration to Canada and its role in national building; older waves of immigration; and shifting attitudes of normalized immigrant groups. — Keywords: immigrants, immigration, refugees, multiculturalism, Canada, newcomers, settlement, research, racism — External Links: https://www.amazon.ca/Unequal-Relations-Introduction-Aboriginal-Dynamics/dp/0132310600

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Activate

Blog of the Centre for Faith and Public Life — Description: The Centre for Faith and Public Life is located in Ottawa, Ontario, only blocks from Parliament Hill and the Supreme Court of Canada. The CFPL promotes biblical principles, from an evangelical perspective, on matters of law and public policy. For more information about the EFC, please visit our website, contact us at activatecfpl@evangelicalfellowship.ca. For detailed and calling information go to www.EvangelicalFellowship.ca/ContactUs. — Keywords: immigration, public policy, laws, social justice, worship, church, evangelism

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State of Immigrant and Refugee Women’s Status in Canada – 2012

— Abstract: This joint report is a brief summary of some of the major developments in federal policy and practice as they impact on immigrant and refugee women in Canada, covering the five year period 2006-11. — Keywords: demographics, new Canadians, foreigner, sojourner, alien, migrant, migrant worker, temporary worker, diaspora, displaced, gateway cities, global, immigration, laws, social justice, public policy, women —

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Studying Congregations

— Abstract: Want to better understand your congregation or your community of faith? By examining a congregation’s ecology, culture, resources and process, we begin to understand its pattern and dynamics. — Reference(s): Janzen, Rich, Mark D. Chapman, and James W. Watson. 2012. Integrating Immigrants into the Life of Canadian Urban Christian Congregations: Findings from a National Survey. Review of Religious Research 53, no. 4: 441-470. http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs13644-011-0025-2 — Keywords: church planting, church mapping — Additional Links: http://studyingcongregations.org

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Integrating Immigrants into the Life of Canadian Urban Christian Congregations: Findings from a National Survey

By Rich Janzen, Mark D. Chapman, and James W. Watson — Abstract: In just one generation the cultural face of Canadian society has been transformed. The relative level of immigration has increased rapidly as has diversity among those immigrants. This article reports on the findings of a national survey that offers a baseline of how and to what extent local Canadian Christian congregations are responding to this cultural diversity. In particular, it explores how churches are integrating immigrants within the life of their local congregations. This article uses a systems change perspective to frame immigrant integration. This perspective emphasizes three requirements for change: vision, structure and processes that promote immigrant integration. Data was collected using an online survey of urban congregations in the nine urban Canadian communities having an immigrant population above the national average (20% foreign-born). Using these data this article explores the full range of immigrant integration efforts from the initial welcome to inclusion into congregational life. It describes the present status of immigrant integration, details reported successes and challenges and notes respondent suggestions for better integration. Results of this survey provide first-time baseline insights into how a range of urban Christian congregations from across Canada are presently responding

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Canadian Christian Churches as Partners in Immigrant Settlement and Integration

By Rich Janzen, Alethea Stobbe, Mark Chapman, and James Watson — Abstract: This article discusses the role of Canadian Christian churches in immigrant settlement and integration and discusses implications for the settlement sector. A total of 34 denominations responded to an online survey. Findings show that many churches are intentionally involved in immigrant ministry, motivated by their Christian and social concern. Existing immigrant supports are wide-ranging and holistic, include the unique contribution of immigrant congregations but are limited by underdeveloped partnerships. It is in the equipping processes of leadership development, training, planning, and evaluation that churches are weakest and could benefit most from partnerships with other settlement players. — Reference(s): Janzen, Rich, Alethea Stobbe, Mark Chapman, and James Watson. 2016. Canadian Christian Churches as Partners in Immigrant Settlement and Integration. Journal of Immigrant & Refugee Studies 1-21. http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/15562948.2015.1123792 — Keywords: Role of Churches. Immigrant Settlement Integration, immigrants, settlement, Newcomers — To access this article: 1. Login to Tyndale University College and Seminary Library with your account 2. Email us for a downloadable copy.

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