WayBase

WayBase WayBase is an online tool for you to find and contact fellow Christian ministries, immigrant/settlement/community centres and services in your city and potentially partner with. Searchable by location (address, postal code, city, etc.), filtered categories of organizations, and/or search keywords. The featured image above demonstrates the use of WayBase to locate some of the services within Toronto, Ontario, Canada, using the search terms “Christian, Multicultural, and Settlement”. About WayBase: https://www.waybase.com/our-story

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CitiIQ

CitiIQ CitiIQ is an approach (in development) for assessing the condition of a city using data. This very broad perspective is useful to consider regarding how the churches of the city make contributions (some of which may be represented in this framework and some of which are beyond the framework). Click here to read more about CitiIQ: https://www.citiiq.com/about    

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Canada’s Ethnocultural Mosaic, 2006 Census

Published by authority of the Minister responsible for Statistics Canada © Minister of Industry, 2008 — Description: This report examines the ethnic origins of Canada’s population using data from the 2006 Census. It also provides information on the nation’s visible minority population. Each wave of immigration to Canada has increased the ethnocultural diversity of the nation’s population. In fact, the 2006 Census enumerated more than 200 different ethnic origins. Ethnic origin refers to the ethnic or cultural origins of the respondent’s ancestors. An ancestor is someone from whom a person is descended and is usually more distant than a grandparent. In contrast, the 1901 Census recorded about 25 different ethnic groups in Canada. People who reported Aboriginal ancestries, and British and French origins, comprised the lion’s share of the population at that time. The list of ethnic origins in 2006 includes cultural groups associated with Canada’s Aboriginal people (North American Indian, Métis and Inuit) and the European groups that first settled in Canada, such as the English, French Scottish and Irish. It includes origins of immigrants who came to Canada over the past century, such as German, Italian, Chinese, Ukrainian, Dutch, Polish, East Indian and so on. Among newer groups

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Joshua Project

— Description: The mission and passion of Joshua Project is to identify and highlight the people groups of the world that have the least exposure to the Gospel and the least Christian presence in their midst. Joshua Project shares this information to encourage pioneer church-planting movements among every ethnic people group. — Keywords: people groups, culture, Church Planting, church development, languages, research — Links: https://joshuaproject.net

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Globe and Mail Multiculturalism Series

— Description: The Globe and Mail published a series of articles in the first week of October, 2010 discussing the benefits and the pitfalls of Canada’s multicultural experiment. You can access the various articles by clicking on the links below. What we fear about Multiculturalism (Published Friday, Oct. 01, 2010) Diversity: Yes, in my backyard (Published Friday, Oct. 01, 2010) When Multiculturalism Doesn’t Work — by Ingrid Peritz and Joe Friesen (Published Friday, Oct. 01, 2010) Multiculturalism: Good, Bad and Ugly (Published Friday, Oct. 01, 2010) A few frank words about immigration — by Margaret Wente (Published Thursday, Oct. 07, 2010) 10 leaders on how to change multiculturalism (Published Friday, Oct. 08, 2010) — Keywords: multiculturalism, diversity, immigrants, culture — http://religionanddiversity.ca

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Cultural Dissonance Among Generations: A Solution-Focused Approach with East Asian Elders and Their Families

From the Journal of Marital and Family Therapy, Vol. 30(4), Ohio State University, 2004 By Mo Yee Lee and LeeAnn Mjelde-Mossey — Abstract: In traditional East Asian cultures, high value is assigned to family harmony and filial piety coupled with the expectation that elders will be honored and obeyed. A lifetime of such expectations shapes how elders perceive their role and status in the family. Problems can arise when younger, less traditional, generations do not share these expectations. This article describes a solution-focused approach that facilitates the family in creating a beneficial harmony in situations of cultural dissonance. Family members are empowered to draw on personal strengths in which multiple worldviews and values of individual members are recognized, incorporated, and negotiated. — Keywords: multicultural, intercultural, diversity, cross-cultural, demographics, culture, ethnic profiles, settlement, family therapy —

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