Diversity and Concentration in Canadian Immigration

Trends in Toronto, Montréal and Vancouver, 1971–2006 — Description: Centre for Urban and Community Studies, Research Bulletin 42 (© University of Toronto 2008) ISBN-13 978-0-7727-1466-4   — Keywords: research, demographics, statistics — External Links: http://www.urbancentre.utoronto.ca/pdfs/researchbulletins/CUCSRB42-Murdie-Cdn-Immigration3-2008.pdf

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United Way Report on Poverty by Postal Code

Description (from the United Way website): The number of poor Toronto neighbourhoods is rising at a rapid rate. In the past two decades, Toronto has changed dramatically and not all for the good. The income gap is widening and neighbourhood poverty has intensified. As the numbers of high poverty neighbourhoods increase — especially in the inner suburbs — everyone’s quality of life suffers. United Way explores the changing geography of neighbourhood poverty in Poverty by Postal Code, its newest report. Poverty by Postal Code encourages public debate and action — the first steps in preserving Toronto as one of the best places in the world to live. — Keywords: demographics, new Canadians, immigrant, foreigner, sojourner, alien, migrant, intercultural, diversity, multicultural, cross-cultural, statistics — External Links: http://web.archive.org/web/20140222164621/http://www.unitedwaytoronto.com/whatWeDo/reports/povertyByPostalCode.php

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Toronto as a Gateway City

The emerging study of gateway cities in sociology, history, and geography (Price and Benton-Short 2008, 6) reflects the significance of contemporary international migration. “While movements of people across borders have shaped states and societies since time immemorial, what is distinctive in recent years is their global scope, their centrality to domestic and international politics and their enormous economic and social consequences” (Castles and Miller 2003, 2). Based on a review of the research literature, Lisa Benton-Short and Marie Price suggest the following themes are significant for gateway cities: Hyperdiversity: This is characterized by “cities where no one country of origin accounts for 25 percent or more of the immigrant stock and immigrants come from all over the world” (Price and Benton-Short 2008, 15).  Episodic: Immigrant flows can change over time as they are influenced by factors of social networks and economics (Price and Benton-Short 2008, 16). -Immigration policies: “Shifting national policies are extremely important in explaining the changing flows and composition of immigrants to cities around the world” (Price and Benton- Short 2008, 17). Urban policies: Which may encourage or discourage immigrants. Identity: “Most people have nested identities based on different scales of belonging” (Price and Benton-Short 2008, 19). Spatial assimilation or segregation: Immigrant

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Arrival City: How the Largest Migration in History Is Reshaping Our World

By Doug Sanders — Description: From Publishers Weekly: In a globe-trotting narrative alive with on-the-ground reportage, journalist Saunders offers a cautionary but essentially optimistic perspective on global urbanization. He concentrates on the slums and satellite communities that act as portals from villages to cities and, in turn, revitalize village economies. Policy makers misunderstand at their peril these “arrival cities”—London’s heavily Bangladeshi Tower Hamlets, Brazil’s favelas, China’s Shenzhen. Citing the statistical relationship between urbanization and falling poverty rates, as well as historical precedents like Paris (“the first great arrival city of the modern world”), Saunders insists urban migration means improvement overall, and that the arrival city serves as a springboard for the integration of new populations. While the picture of urbanization veers from gloomier forecasts by analysts like Mike Davis (Planet of Slums), it does so by eschewing direct questioning of the global economic system driving much of this migration. Barely addressed are food, energy, and water shortages, or the fact that healthy city growth requires preservation of surrounding ecosystems on which cities habitually wreak havoc. Saunders’s narrative, however, does plead for rational and humane planning within global capitalism to ensure that arrival cities fulfill their purpose and achieve their potential.

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Immigration and Ethnocultural Diversity

— Description: From Statistics Canada: Information on ethnic groups, visible minorities, the Canadian-born population, immigrants and non-permanent residents, and generation status in Canada (first generation, second generation, third generation or longer) https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/n1/en/subjects/immigration_and_ethnocultural_diversity — Keywords: global, commission, gateway cities, displaced, diaspora, missiology, missional, demographics, diversity, intercultural, cross-cultural, ethnic profiles, country profiles, language, new Canadians, immigrant, refugee, foreigner, sojourner, alien, migrant, migrant worker, temporary worker, international student

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Globe and Mail Multiculturalism Series

— Description: The Globe and Mail published a series of articles in the first week of October, 2010 discussing the benefits and the pitfalls of Canada’s multicultural experiment. You can access the various articles by clicking on the links below. What we fear about Multiculturalism (Published Friday, Oct. 01, 2010) Diversity: Yes, in my backyard (Published Friday, Oct. 01, 2010) When Multiculturalism Doesn’t Work — by Ingrid Peritz and Joe Friesen (Published Friday, Oct. 01, 2010) Multiculturalism: Good, Bad and Ugly (Published Friday, Oct. 01, 2010) A few frank words about immigration — by Margaret Wente (Published Thursday, Oct. 07, 2010) 10 leaders on how to change multiculturalism (Published Friday, Oct. 08, 2010) — Keywords: multiculturalism, diversity, immigrants, culture — http://religionanddiversity.ca

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Faith on the Move

The Religious Affiliation of International Migrants — Abstract: A new report on religion and international migration by the Pew Research Center’s Forum on Religion & Public Life finds that Christians comprise nearly half – an estimated 106 million, or 49% – of the world’s 214 million international migrants. According to the study, Faith on the Move: The Religious Affiliation of International Migrants, Muslims make up the second-largest group – almost 60 million, or 27%. The remaining quarter is a mix of Hindus, Buddhists, Jews, adherents of other faiths and the religiously unaffiliated (those who identify as atheists and agnostics or say they have no particular religion). — Keywords: diaspora, displaced, gateway cities, global, demographics, immigrant, refugee, foreigner, sojourner, alien, migrant, migrant worker, temporary worker, statistics, religious affiliation, religion — Additional Links: Faith on the Move – The Religious Affiliation of International Migrants

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State of Immigrant and Refugee Women’s Status in Canada – 2012

— Abstract: This joint report is a brief summary of some of the major developments in federal policy and practice as they impact on immigrant and refugee women in Canada, covering the five year period 2006-11. — Keywords: demographics, new Canadians, foreigner, sojourner, alien, migrant, migrant worker, temporary worker, diaspora, displaced, gateway cities, global, immigration, laws, social justice, public policy, women —

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