That All May Be One: A Resource for Educating toward Racial Justice

Edited by Wenh-In Ng — Description: 2004: United Church Publishing House This handbook provides material for reflection, education and action to help individuals and congregations recognize, resist and eliminate racism. It contains excellent reflections and workshops designed to give life to the United Church anti-racism policy. Available from the United Church of Canada Resource Distribution Centre. — Keywords: diversity, cultural sensitivity, anti-racism, policy, church development, training, United Church, social justice — External Links: http://www.ucrdstore.ca/that-all-may-be-one-brochure-an-introduction-to-the-united-church-s-anti-racism-policy.html

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Anglican Resources for Multicultural Sunday

— Description: Designating and celebrating the Feast of Pentecost as a Multicultural Sunday allows the Anglican Diocese of Toronto to embody a vision to recognize the value of diversity in building communities of hope and compassion as expressed in Ephesians 2:19: So then you are no longer strangers and sojourners, but you are fellow citizens with the saints and members of the household of God. It is our hope that these parish resources will help reflect and act on what it means to be a multicultural church. — Keywords: church planting, Christian ministry, newcomers, missions, immigrant services, multicultural, social justice, new Canadians, immigrant, foreigner, alien, migrant, intercultural, diversity, cross-cultural, missional, commission, church development, worship, church, evangelism — External Links: http://www.toronto.anglican.ca/parish-life/diversity-resources

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Canada’s Ethnocultural Mosaic, 2006 Census

Published by authority of the Minister responsible for Statistics Canada © Minister of Industry, 2008 — Description: This report examines the ethnic origins of Canada’s population using data from the 2006 Census. It also provides information on the nation’s visible minority population. Each wave of immigration to Canada has increased the ethnocultural diversity of the nation’s population. In fact, the 2006 Census enumerated more than 200 different ethnic origins. Ethnic origin refers to the ethnic or cultural origins of the respondent’s ancestors. An ancestor is someone from whom a person is descended and is usually more distant than a grandparent. In contrast, the 1901 Census recorded about 25 different ethnic groups in Canada. People who reported Aboriginal ancestries, and British and French origins, comprised the lion’s share of the population at that time. The list of ethnic origins in 2006 includes cultural groups associated with Canada’s Aboriginal people (North American Indian, Métis and Inuit) and the European groups that first settled in Canada, such as the English, French Scottish and Irish. It includes origins of immigrants who came to Canada over the past century, such as German, Italian, Chinese, Ukrainian, Dutch, Polish, East Indian and so on. Among newer groups

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United Way Report on Poverty by Postal Code

Description (from the United Way website): The number of poor Toronto neighbourhoods is rising at a rapid rate. In the past two decades, Toronto has changed dramatically and not all for the good. The income gap is widening and neighbourhood poverty has intensified. As the numbers of high poverty neighbourhoods increase — especially in the inner suburbs — everyone’s quality of life suffers. United Way explores the changing geography of neighbourhood poverty in Poverty by Postal Code, its newest report. Poverty by Postal Code encourages public debate and action — the first steps in preserving Toronto as one of the best places in the world to live. — Keywords: demographics, new Canadians, immigrant, foreigner, sojourner, alien, migrant, intercultural, diversity, multicultural, cross-cultural, statistics — External Links: http://web.archive.org/web/20140222164621/http://www.unitedwaytoronto.com/whatWeDo/reports/povertyByPostalCode.php

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Arrival City: How the Largest Migration in History Is Reshaping Our World

By Doug Sanders — Description: From Publishers Weekly: In a globe-trotting narrative alive with on-the-ground reportage, journalist Saunders offers a cautionary but essentially optimistic perspective on global urbanization. He concentrates on the slums and satellite communities that act as portals from villages to cities and, in turn, revitalize village economies. Policy makers misunderstand at their peril these “arrival cities”—London’s heavily Bangladeshi Tower Hamlets, Brazil’s favelas, China’s Shenzhen. Citing the statistical relationship between urbanization and falling poverty rates, as well as historical precedents like Paris (“the first great arrival city of the modern world”), Saunders insists urban migration means improvement overall, and that the arrival city serves as a springboard for the integration of new populations. While the picture of urbanization veers from gloomier forecasts by analysts like Mike Davis (Planet of Slums), it does so by eschewing direct questioning of the global economic system driving much of this migration. Barely addressed are food, energy, and water shortages, or the fact that healthy city growth requires preservation of surrounding ecosystems on which cities habitually wreak havoc. Saunders’s narrative, however, does plead for rational and humane planning within global capitalism to ensure that arrival cities fulfill their purpose and achieve their potential.

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Multiculturalism

— Description: From Amazon.ca: A new edition of the highly acclaimed book Multiculturalism and “The Politics of Recognition,” this paperback brings together an even wider range of leading philosophers and social scientists to probe the political controversy surrounding multiculturalism. Charles Taylor’s initial inquiry, which considers whether the institutions of liberal democratic government make room–or should make room–for recognizing the worth of distinctive cultural traditions, remains the centerpiece of this discussion. It is now joined by Jürgen Habermas’s extensive essay on the issues of recognition and the democratic constitutional state and by K. Anthony Appiah’s commentary on the tensions between personal and collective identities, such as those shaped by religion, gender, ethnicity, race, and sexuality, and on the dangerous tendency of multicultural politics to gloss over such tensions. These contributions are joined by those of other well-known thinkers, who further relate the demand for recognition to issues of multicultural education, feminism, and cultural separatism. — Keywords: gateway cities, global urbanization, diaspora, diversity, cultural sensitivity — External Links:

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Immigration and Ethnocultural Diversity

— Description: From Statistics Canada: Information on ethnic groups, visible minorities, the Canadian-born population, immigrants and non-permanent residents, and generation status in Canada (first generation, second generation, third generation or longer) https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/n1/en/subjects/immigration_and_ethnocultural_diversity — Keywords: global, commission, gateway cities, displaced, diaspora, missiology, missional, demographics, diversity, intercultural, cross-cultural, ethnic profiles, country profiles, language, new Canadians, immigrant, refugee, foreigner, sojourner, alien, migrant, migrant worker, temporary worker, international student

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Globe and Mail Multiculturalism Series

— Description: The Globe and Mail published a series of articles in the first week of October, 2010 discussing the benefits and the pitfalls of Canada’s multicultural experiment. You can access the various articles by clicking on the links below. What we fear about Multiculturalism (Published Friday, Oct. 01, 2010) Diversity: Yes, in my backyard (Published Friday, Oct. 01, 2010) When Multiculturalism Doesn’t Work — by Ingrid Peritz and Joe Friesen (Published Friday, Oct. 01, 2010) Multiculturalism: Good, Bad and Ugly (Published Friday, Oct. 01, 2010) A few frank words about immigration — by Margaret Wente (Published Thursday, Oct. 07, 2010) 10 leaders on how to change multiculturalism (Published Friday, Oct. 08, 2010) — Keywords: multiculturalism, diversity, immigrants, culture — http://religionanddiversity.ca

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Religion and Diversity Project

— Description: The aim of this project is to address the following question: What are the contours of religious diversity in Canada and how can we best respond to the opportunities and challenges presented by religious diversity in ways that promote a just and peaceful society? Specifically, the proposed project investigates the following questions:1. How are religious identities socially constructed? How is religious expression defined and delimited in law and public policy? How and why do gender and sexuality act as flashpoints in debates on religious freedom? What are alternative strategies for managing religious diversity? The discursive and practical uses that are made of ideas of “religious diversity” are at the centre of this project. Its two main aims are (a) to understand how these ideas are constructed, deployed and criticized in private and public contexts that include social scientific data and research, political and legal debates, and policy making, and (b) to consider how best to respond to the opportunities and challenges presented by the variety of meanings attributed to religious diversity in ways that promote a just and peaceful society. We seek to understand more fully how religion intersects with and is part of legal, political and social

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Cultural Dissonance Among Generations: A Solution-Focused Approach with East Asian Elders and Their Families

From the Journal of Marital and Family Therapy, Vol. 30(4), Ohio State University, 2004 By Mo Yee Lee and LeeAnn Mjelde-Mossey — Abstract: In traditional East Asian cultures, high value is assigned to family harmony and filial piety coupled with the expectation that elders will be honored and obeyed. A lifetime of such expectations shapes how elders perceive their role and status in the family. Problems can arise when younger, less traditional, generations do not share these expectations. This article describes a solution-focused approach that facilitates the family in creating a beneficial harmony in situations of cultural dissonance. Family members are empowered to draw on personal strengths in which multiple worldviews and values of individual members are recognized, incorporated, and negotiated. — Keywords: multicultural, intercultural, diversity, cross-cultural, demographics, culture, ethnic profiles, settlement, family therapy —

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