Beginning the Discussion

By Ruth Cassidy and James Grunaua — Abstract: God calls the church to deep levels of engagement with refugees and new immigrants that ultimately reveals God’s heart of compassion for vulnerable people, his desire for believers to live in right relationship with the “other,” his design for creation that includes unity with diversity, and his self-giving love that invites broken humanity into its embrace. — Keywords: new Canadian, refugee, sojourner, diaspora, displaced, church development, education, training —

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Toronto as a Gateway City

The emerging study of gateway cities in sociology, history, and geography (Price and Benton-Short 2008, 6) reflects the significance of contemporary international migration. “While movements of people across borders have shaped states and societies since time immemorial, what is distinctive in recent years is their global scope, their centrality to domestic and international politics and their enormous economic and social consequences” (Castles and Miller 2003, 2). Based on a review of the research literature, Lisa Benton-Short and Marie Price suggest the following themes are significant for gateway cities: Hyperdiversity: This is characterized by “cities where no one country of origin accounts for 25 percent or more of the immigrant stock and immigrants come from all over the world” (Price and Benton-Short 2008, 15).  Episodic: Immigrant flows can change over time as they are influenced by factors of social networks and economics (Price and Benton-Short 2008, 16). -Immigration policies: “Shifting national policies are extremely important in explaining the changing flows and composition of immigrants to cities around the world” (Price and Benton- Short 2008, 17). Urban policies: Which may encourage or discourage immigrants. Identity: “Most people have nested identities based on different scales of belonging” (Price and Benton-Short 2008, 19). Spatial assimilation or segregation: Immigrant

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MissionGTA

— Vision: To see the Kingdom of God impact every sphere of society by facilitating unity in the body of Christ across the Greater Toronto Area. Our strategy is simple: (1) identify the key indicators of a transformed city and establish and monitor benchmarks for each of these indicators, and (2) facilitate unity in body of Christ across the Greater Toronto Area by… Connecting various groups who are already causing a transformational impact in the different spheres of society as identified by the key indicators, and where such groups do not exist encourage their formation. Providing representative leaders of the different geographical communities of the GTA with opportunities for interaction, prayer and strategy formation. Providing representative leaders of the different diaspora communities of the GTA with opportunities for interaction, prayer and strategy formation. Mobilizing unified intercession across the GTA. Providing the Body of Christ with opportunities for regional prayer gatherings, including City Hall Prayer, Prayer Summits and Global Day of Prayer Encouraging the creation of a communication hub for all Christian activity in the GTA. — Keywords: Christian Ministry, strategy formation, GTA, Toronto, diaspora, urban ministry — http://www.missiongta.com

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Lausanne Occasional Paper — 55

Diasporas and International Students: The New People Next Door — Description: This publication is about the opportunities and challenges presented to Christians by the presence of people from different countries, who are now living near them. It is written for vicars, pastors and other leaders of Christian congregations and ministries. It describes the findings of about 50 people who discussed this subject at the Lausanne 2004 Forum for World Evangelization in Thailand in October 2004. They wanted this message to be conveyed to all churches and ministries who are faced with these opportunities and challenges. The movement of peoples in our world creates many new challenges. The word ‘Diaspora’ meaning ‘a scattering’ is used to describe this large-scale movement of people from their homeland to settle permanently or temporarily in other countries. — Keywords: lausanne, diaspora, international students — External Links: https://www.lausanne.org/wp-content/uploads/2007/06/LOP55_IG26.pdf

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Foundations in Missional Ministry & Church Leadership Diploma

At the Tyndale Intercultural Ministries (TIM) Centre — Description: Tyndale Intercultural Ministries (TIM) Centre’s Foundations in Missional Ministry & Church Leadership Diploma, was introduced in October 2010. One of the exciting developments in contemporary church planting in the Canadian context is the growth of immigrant churches in urban cities like Toronto. As God continues to bring Spirit-filled Christians from the non-western world to Canada, we can expect to see the exciting new church-planting models, which do not fit the typical Canadian paradigm. One of the challenges facing immigrant church leaders, is how to find training that is accessible, affordable, and recognized for credentialing leaders to serve in pastoral ministry within their church affiliation. The Foundations in Missional Ministry & Church Leadership will train immigrant church leaders to be certified by the denominations partnering with the TIM Centre. The Diaspora Leaders training has two distinct dimensions. First, there will be basic foundation courses related to Bible Interpretation, OT-NT Survey, Basic Bible Doctrines, and Introduction to Pastoral Ministry. Second, the missional courses will be part of the Forge –Toronto “ethos”. For more information on the ethos, see the core values tab. For more information on the courses, see the curriculum tab. Download the

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An Anthropological Approach To Diaspora Missiology

By Dr. Steven Ybarrola — Abstract: The discipline of anthropology has, throughout much of its short history, been interested in the migration, adaptation, and identity of peoples. Throughout much of the 1970s and 1980s anthropologists produced a plethora of ethnographic works dealing with ethnicity, inter-ethnic relations, and ethnic identity. However, beginning in the 1990s the focus began to turn towards the study of diaspora communities and the transnational connections these communities often maintained with “home.” In this paper, I examine ways in which anthropology can contribute to our understanding of diaspora missiology, and I argue that the study of the religious dimensions of diaspora communities can create a common interest, and even a partnership, between anthropologists and missiologists. — Keywords: missiology, diaspora, displaced, ethnography, anthropology

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Arrival City: How the Largest Migration in History Is Reshaping Our World

By Doug Sanders — Description: From Publishers Weekly: In a globe-trotting narrative alive with on-the-ground reportage, journalist Saunders offers a cautionary but essentially optimistic perspective on global urbanization. He concentrates on the slums and satellite communities that act as portals from villages to cities and, in turn, revitalize village economies. Policy makers misunderstand at their peril these “arrival cities”—London’s heavily Bangladeshi Tower Hamlets, Brazil’s favelas, China’s Shenzhen. Citing the statistical relationship between urbanization and falling poverty rates, as well as historical precedents like Paris (“the first great arrival city of the modern world”), Saunders insists urban migration means improvement overall, and that the arrival city serves as a springboard for the integration of new populations. While the picture of urbanization veers from gloomier forecasts by analysts like Mike Davis (Planet of Slums), it does so by eschewing direct questioning of the global economic system driving much of this migration. Barely addressed are food, energy, and water shortages, or the fact that healthy city growth requires preservation of surrounding ecosystems on which cities habitually wreak havoc. Saunders’s narrative, however, does plead for rational and humane planning within global capitalism to ensure that arrival cities fulfill their purpose and achieve their potential.

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Multiculturalism

— Description: From Amazon.ca: A new edition of the highly acclaimed book Multiculturalism and “The Politics of Recognition,” this paperback brings together an even wider range of leading philosophers and social scientists to probe the political controversy surrounding multiculturalism. Charles Taylor’s initial inquiry, which considers whether the institutions of liberal democratic government make room–or should make room–for recognizing the worth of distinctive cultural traditions, remains the centerpiece of this discussion. It is now joined by Jürgen Habermas’s extensive essay on the issues of recognition and the democratic constitutional state and by K. Anthony Appiah’s commentary on the tensions between personal and collective identities, such as those shaped by religion, gender, ethnicity, race, and sexuality, and on the dangerous tendency of multicultural politics to gloss over such tensions. These contributions are joined by those of other well-known thinkers, who further relate the demand for recognition to issues of multicultural education, feminism, and cultural separatism. — Keywords: gateway cities, global urbanization, diaspora, diversity, cultural sensitivity — External Links:

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Immigration and Ethnocultural Diversity

— Description: From Statistics Canada: Information on ethnic groups, visible minorities, the Canadian-born population, immigrants and non-permanent residents, and generation status in Canada (first generation, second generation, third generation or longer) https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/n1/en/subjects/immigration_and_ethnocultural_diversity — Keywords: global, commission, gateway cities, displaced, diaspora, missiology, missional, demographics, diversity, intercultural, cross-cultural, ethnic profiles, country profiles, language, new Canadians, immigrant, refugee, foreigner, sojourner, alien, migrant, migrant worker, temporary worker, international student

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Faith on the Move

The Religious Affiliation of International Migrants — Abstract: A new report on religion and international migration by the Pew Research Center’s Forum on Religion & Public Life finds that Christians comprise nearly half – an estimated 106 million, or 49% – of the world’s 214 million international migrants. According to the study, Faith on the Move: The Religious Affiliation of International Migrants, Muslims make up the second-largest group – almost 60 million, or 27%. The remaining quarter is a mix of Hindus, Buddhists, Jews, adherents of other faiths and the religiously unaffiliated (those who identify as atheists and agnostics or say they have no particular religion). — Keywords: diaspora, displaced, gateway cities, global, demographics, immigrant, refugee, foreigner, sojourner, alien, migrant, migrant worker, temporary worker, statistics, religious affiliation, religion — Additional Links: Faith on the Move – The Religious Affiliation of International Migrants

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